Endorsement of Stephen Coston’s book King James Unjustly Accused?

The basic premise of Stephen Coston’s book King James VI of Scotland & I of England Unjustly Accused? is that the writings of King James and his contemporaries and the actions described therein interpreted in the context of the times do not constitute overwhelming evidence of homosexuality. Coston’s book seems to be well documented and well researched. Although I have not read books from the other side alleging King James was a homosexual, the author of this book does not seem to avoid statements and actions of King James which are hard to explain. Coston is relatively respectful when he disagrees with other authors on this matter, and does not stoop to ad hominem attacks.

 

One thing is for sure—although some of his actions and writings would have been looked upon as more benign in his generation, King James was often guilty of not abstaining from “the appearance of evil” (1 Thes. 5:22). The writings and actions of this king serve to demonstrate to us how not avoiding the appearance of evil can easily open someone up to accusations and be harmful to one’s Christian testimony.

 

As a result of the documentation in this book, those of us who use the King James Version can rest assured in knowing that there is another side to the allegations of King James’ homosexuality, and we can continue using the KJV proudly without cringing at the thought that our Bible may have been named in honor of a proven homosexual.

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